I draw the webcomic Manly Guys Doing Manly Things and work on cartoons you might see on TV sometimes.

 

oldmanyellsatcloud:

coelasquid:

One of my favourite premises for a zombie story is in the book “Feed”, where the mainstream media collapsed on itself after the zombies broke out and they took a very conservative “keep calm carry on, it’s just a hoax by those darned kids” but all the bloggers took a proactive “This is what is happening, this is where it’s happening, this is how you can kill them” approach. The book follows the first team of bloggers invited to follow a presidential candidate’s campaign trail and probably puts more emphasis on how peoples’ growing mistrust of the media - especially in the younger generations - reshaped the standards for sharing information online than it does on the actual zombies.

This the book in question? Between your description and the plug that its “shunning misogynistic horror tropes in favor of genuine drama and pure creepiness”, that actually sounds like an interesting read. 

Yeah, that’s it. I dunno about “shunning misogynistic horror tropes” because that feels like it implies active gender war stuff, but I didn’t get any of that (granted I’m only about a third of the way in). Mostly just a story about a zombie journalist and her brother trying to claw their way up through a highly competitive blogosphere.

(Source: inothernews)

inothernews:

The New York Times just pisses me off some days.
At this point, they’ve had more than 24 hours to get an official police response to the pepper spray incident from the New York Police Department. 
But in Sarah Maslin-Nir’s blog post, published up at 1:45pm, the best the “newspaper of record” could do was say “a request to the Police Department for comment was not immediately returned.”
The NYPD’s public information office is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.  Nothing from them?
As is the City Hall press office, with someone always on call.  No one there at all to talk to?
What about all of your vaunted police sources who confirm your other stories left and right?  Are they somehow unreachable in this age of cell phones, Blackberrys, iPhones and — gasp!!! — emails?
Meanwhile, Ginia Bellafante’s piece, which has been up since last night, has a dickshittish quote from a day trader who was all too happy to snark on the protesters’ use of a particular brand of computer.
I know it’s Sunday, Times folk, but this is pretty inexcusable.  Especially when you’re playing up an op-ed asking “Whatever happened to the American left?”
Don’t look now, but you probably just helped to wake them up.

One of my favourite premises for a zombie story is in the book “Feed”, where the mainstream media collapsed on itself after the zombies broke out and they took a very conservative “keep calm carry on, it’s just a hoax by those darned kids” but all the bloggers took a proactive “This is what is happening, this is where it’s happening, this is how you can kill them” approach. The book follows the first team of bloggers invited to follow a presidential candidate’s campaign trail and probably puts more emphasis on how peoples’ growing mistrust of the media - especially in the younger generations - reshaped the standards for sharing information online than it does on the actual zombies.

inothernews:

The New York Times just pisses me off some days.

At this point, they’ve had more than 24 hours to get an official police response to the pepper spray incident from the New York Police Department. 

But in Sarah Maslin-Nir’s blog post, published up at 1:45pm, the best the “newspaper of record” could do was say “a request to the Police Department for comment was not immediately returned.”

The NYPD’s public information office is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.  Nothing from them?

As is the City Hall press office, with someone always on call.  No one there at all to talk to?

What about all of your vaunted police sources who confirm your other stories left and right?  Are they somehow unreachable in this age of cell phones, Blackberrys, iPhones and — gasp!!! — emails?

Meanwhile, Ginia Bellafante’s piece, which has been up since last night, has a dickshittish quote from a day trader who was all too happy to snark on the protesters’ use of a particular brand of computer.

I know it’s Sunday, Times folk, but this is pretty inexcusable.  Especially when you’re playing up an op-ed asking “Whatever happened to the American left?”

Don’t look now, but you probably just helped to wake them up.

One of my favourite premises for a zombie story is in the book “Feed”, where the mainstream media collapsed on itself after the zombies broke out and they took a very conservative “keep calm carry on, it’s just a hoax by those darned kids” but all the bloggers took a proactive “This is what is happening, this is where it’s happening, this is how you can kill them” approach. The book follows the first team of bloggers invited to follow a presidential candidate’s campaign trail and probably puts more emphasis on how peoples’ growing mistrust of the media - especially in the younger generations - reshaped the standards for sharing information online than it does on the actual zombies.